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Driving to Prime (Four DVD Box Set)

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$395.00

Quick Overview

There are four critical roles that must be played in an organization if it is to be successful over both the short and long term. How well these roles are being played and kept in balance to a large extent determine an organization's culture and its future success.


The challenge is that these roles are complex and demanding and it is impossible for one person to play them all. Especially challenging is that as an organization grows and develops the demand for these roles changes. These role demands go through a predictable evolution taking an organization through successive evolutionary phases each with its own particular demands and challenges. For leaders and managers it is critical that we respond to these demands and challenges if we are to successfully drive an organization to its most effective and efficient stage of development. A stage we call Prime.


Driving to Prime DVD Set

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  • Driving to Prime DVD Set

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There are four critical roles that must be played in an organization if it is to be successful over both the short and long term. How well these roles are being played and kept in balance to a large extent determine an organization's culture and its future success.

The challenge is that these roles are complex and demanding and it is impossible for one person to play them all. Especially challenging is that as an organization grows and develops the demand for these roles changes. These role demands go through a predictable evolution taking an organization through successive evolutionary phases each with its own particular demands and challenges. For leaders and managers it is critical that we respond to these demands and challenges if we are to successfully drive an organization to its most effective and efficient stage of development. A stage we call Prime.

Disc One in this series, Management Roles and Organizational Cultures. Dr. Faust defines the four critical roles and identifies their strengths and weaknesses. You will learn how to identify the roles and their relative strength in an organization and their relationship to and impact on an organization’s culture. You will also get a brief introduction to four very related management or work styles. These styles are driven by a person’s personality and their typical patterns of behavior. This discussion will allow you to identify different personality styles and the most likely style demands of various jobs/positions and to see the relationships of management and work styles to organizational cultures. This can be important as you build an organization, staff different functions and identify areas of potential conflict and provide coaching to your people. By the end of this video, you should be able to describe your organization’s culture with a profile representing the relative strength of the four roles as they are played in your organization today, identify the implications of this culture over time and get some insights into changes you might want to make.

Disc Two, The Organizational Life Cycle: The Growing Phases builds on the understanding of Management and Leadership Roles and Organizational Cultures to include how culture evolves as an organization grows and develops. This starts the discussion of Organizational Life Cycles and the predictable phases that organizations go through as they build their strength, vitality and long term potential.

At each phase there is a most desirable culture and organizations have predictable problems. They face predictable challenges and must take predictable actions and make predictable changes if they are to continue to progress on the healthy pathway to Prime. Failure to solve these problems can retard an organization’s life cycle progress, cause it to prematurely age or even prematurely die. Each of the growing phases will be discussed in detail and the typical challenges identified. The causes of premature aging will be identified along with some of the things organizations can do to avoid them.

Disc Three, The Life Cycle of Organizations: The Aging Phases completes the description of the Organizational Life Cycle with the focus on how and why organization’s age. Aging is not dependent on time, but rather is exhibited in culture and a related state of mind which impacts how decisions are made, what decisions are made and ultimately the success and long term potential of an organization. You will learn that as with growing, aging also proceeds through predictable phases. Decline starts very slowly, the changes are very subtle, and aging is often not identified in the busy life of business leaders. But, the clues are there if you are aware of them. As aging progresses it has a stronger and more observable impact on the organization. In this program you will learn to identify the causes and the signs of early aging even in successful organizations. You will also learn that aging in organizations is reversible.

Discs 1-3 are designed to provide a conceptual base for understanding Management and Leadership Roles, Organizational Cultures and their relationship to the Life Cycle of Organizations. These discs discuss key factors that drive the healthy growing process in organizations, some ways to prevent aging (premature or natural) and even present some ideas as to how to create organizational turn around.

However, it is Disc Four: The Road to Prime that will specifically focus on organizational therapy. Here the focus is on how to avoid the pitfalls, prepare for and overcome challenges and make the key evolutionary and revolutionary changes that drive an organization to Prime. You will learn the key activities and processes that will keep a Prime organization healthy and prevent aging. We will also discuss the key processes and activities that you can use to identify the signs and symptoms of aging and how to drive the culture, strategy and performance turn-around of aging organizations.

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